Posts by: Seth

IMG_9946The formula is slowly coming into balance here at the farm. Just as our harvest started last week the heat and a little water from the sky came together with our warming soil and regular sun to get things going. Maura and I left the farm for a few days to attend my cousins wedding down in Georgia (it was hotter here on Friday!) and came back sunday evening to taller more robust fields of crops. This was heartening as last week’s harvest was lighter than we would have liked, due mostly to the low temps and below normal rainfall.  We are slowly starting to build volume and diversity for your shares.  This week we add salad turnips and broccoli with strawberries and summer squash coming next week.

IMG_9950Upic Builds

Our Upic field is filling up with crops and growing steadily towards the first harvest out there. Our first couple plantings of beans are in and up, tomatoes have a first trellising and we seed our new star, edamame this week. Sugarsnap and snow peas will open the field this year, usually on or about July 4. Look to the newsletter for news of more crops out there and when/how to start picking these favorites for your share.

Egg Share Starts this Week

If you signed up for an egg share please grab a dozen and check your name off the list. We will usually have extra eggs available for sale as well.

Mushroom Share Starts Next Week!

It hasn’t been a slow start just for us. Oyster Creek Mushroom in Damariscotta has also had a pokey start due to weather. The share will start next week (and go an extra week this fall). The great news is if you would still like to add a mushroom share go for it! Follow this link to sign-up online.

What’s in the Share?IMG_9949

Kale/Chard

Broccoli

Lettuce

Salad Turnips

Asian Greens

Gelato Full-Circle

For the past few years we stocked Gelato Fiasco flavors in the farm store. Josh and Bruno, who own this local company, have used our watermelon, strawberries and cantaloupe to make their amazing frozen concoctions in years past. We love their Gelato as well as their commitment to using local milk and ingredients. This winter we were especially thankful to know them when we got a call that winter weather and trucking mishaps had left them with an oversupply of milk and cream.  Thinking on their feet they gave their local farm a call, hoping we could find a use for a large quantity of beautiful dairy products. We trucked right down to their Brunswick kitchen and loaded over a thousand pounds of dairy onto our trailer in the middle of one of the many brisk February days. Not everyone would be excited by a truckload of dairy products, but I knew our winter pigs would be! The cold froze the milk solid and we were able to share it with our winter friends, thawing a few gallons at a time.

 

IMG_9514The rain of the past couple days is so welcome.  As Texas dries out we are starting what we hope will be the process of catching up with moisture lost over the past couple months. It is so unusual to have prolonged dryness combined with cool the temperatures we’ve had this spring.  We are still running behind for the simple reason we have not been able to plant much.  Greens, our major crop this time of year, don’t mind cooler soil but depend on water for their small root systems.  Root crops, nightshades, and onions need heat in order to develop (as well as water!).  This double whammy of dry and cold has kept the greenhouse full of plants waiting to go out as we all waited for heat and rain. April brought us three inches (four is average, and some of that was snow)!  May was California-like with only a half-inch of rain instead of our usual four minimum. Needless to say we are happy we have irrigation systems and have spent many evenings running water here and there to keep young seedings rooting in dusty ground.

There’s always a silver lining…IMG_9573

While all of the rain has been a challenge to our vegetables the bees pollinating our blueberries have been enjoying the uninterrupted sunny days.  Bees don’t fly on rainy days so with all this sun they have been working hard. Wild blueberries begin to bloom in mid-May and there is a tight 3-4 week period where each flower must be visited by a pollinator to create a berry. While there are many native pollinators about we also bring in bees to help maximize the potential number of berries.  This year we trucked 72 hives from Swan’s Honey in Albion to spend a month in our berry fields. An exciting trip, we try to load the bees in the late evening when they are calm and likely to stay in the hives.  After sunset I arrived in the fields with the humming flatbed and before sunrise I unloaded the hives which woke up and quickly got to work.

With the immediate water debt behind us, we are very enthusiastic to start harvests and the CSA next week. Look for our weekly newsletter on Mondays which will detail what you can find in you share along with a recipe and news from the farm.

When Do I Get My First CSA Share?

We start next week!  (The week of June 8th):

Brunswick members: Tuesday or Friday 2:00-7:00, come either day – just once during the week.  You do not need to commit to a day or let us know if you change days.

Portland Area Delivered Share: Wednesday afternoon delivery.  Check with your site coordinator for the time and where to find your farm box.

Portland Area Delivered Share Orientation

For our Portland Area members, we welcome you to come to the farm, meet your farmers, and see where and how your veggies are growing!  A great chance to learn the ins and outs of the upic field.

Sunday July 12, 4:00 p.m.

Saturday July 18th 4:00 p.m.

Egg share

Here’s how it works… You will have a dozen eggs waiting for you each week when  you come to the farm for your share or in your delivery box.  The eggs are from our friends at Sparrow Farm who raise their hens on pasture, ensuring they have a diverse diet and orange yolks. The share runs for 20 weeks (June 16-October 27) and is $110. Click here for the link.

We will have eggs available for sale ($5.50 per dozen, same price as egg share) each week as well if you do not want to commit to the egg share.

Mushroom share

Here’s how it works… You will have a fresh mushrooms each week when  you come to the farm for your share or in your delivery box. Oyster Creek Mushroom Co. raises and wildcrafts these for us.  Each week she provides a different type of mushroom.  The share runs for 18 weeks (June 16-October 13) and is $207. Click here for the link.

Email Contacts!

Please check to see that your your share partners and family members are receiving this email.  If they have not, anyone may be added to the list by following this link.

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IMG_9589I feel like we went over the falls in a barrel this year.  All of a sudden we went from snow to summer.  The days are warm, and things are growing at such a speed that I can’t feel the ground beneath my feet!  The good news is we are catching up and the greenhouse that has been bursting at the seams for the past six weeks is starting to look empty.  Onions, tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant have all gone out in the last week.  Carrots, beets, kale, and lettuce are coming up strong and with any luck we will be starting our harvests on time.

Here’s what’s ahead in the newsletter…

  • When Does the CSA Start?
  • Pick-up and delivery info
  • Newsletter lists: Email contacts
  • Egg Shares
  • Mushroom Shares
  • New member orientation!!!!!
  • Payment link
  • Local food helps with the drought out west
  • Energy alternatives on the farm

When Does the CSA Start?

We will have an answer to this all important question next Monday, May 25 so look for an email from us by then end of the day.

When do we pick up/expect our first box?

Brunswick members: Tuesday or Friday 2:00-7:00, come either day – just once during the week.  You do not need to commit to a day or let us know if you change days.

Portland area delivered shares: Wednesday afternoon delivery.  Check with your site coordinator for the time and where to find your farm box.

Email Contacts!

Please check to see that your your share partners and family members are receiving this email.  If they have not, anyone may be added to the list by following this link.

Egg share

Here’s how it works… You will have a dozen eggs waiting for you each week when  you come to the farm for your share or in your delivery box.  The eggs are from our friends at Sparrow farm who raise their hens on pasture, ensuring they have a diverse diet and orange yolks. The share runs for 20 weeks (June 16-October 27) and is $110. Click here for the link.

Mushroom share

Here’s how it works… You will have a fresh mushrooms each week when  you come to the farm for your share or in your delivery box. Oyster Creek Mushroom Co. raises and wildcrafts these for us.  The share runs for 18 weeks (June 16-October 13) and is $207. Click here for the link.

New Member Orientation!

We invite new members to visit the farm for an informal orientation, to meet us and learn the ropes of the CSA pick up here at the farm.   Please come if you can either Saturday May 30 at 4:00 pm or Sunday May 31 at 4:00.  If you’re not able to come, we will show you around when you do come to pick up your vegetables.  This orientation is geared for Brunswick on-farm members.  

Farm Visits for Portland-area Delivered Share Members!

We invite our Portland-area delivered share members to come visit the farm, meet your farmers, see our operations, and learn how to use the Upic field (this will be available starting in July, more info to come).  Please come either Sunday July 12th at 9:00 am or Saturday July 18th at 4:00 pm.

Payments

We are so grateful for all the payments that have come in over the past several months.  If you would like to make a payment, click here (or find the link on our home page as well).  To help keep track of your payments, you will need your member number, which you may find in an emailed receipt.  If you need help, contact Maura – info@crystalspringcsa.com  Thank you!

Doing Your Part to Help with thew California Drought

Your farm share is is helping California reduce its water use!  Agriculture is the majority user of water in that dry state and by eating local with us this summer you are reducing the amount of produce they have to grow and ship east. It’s amazing how much water it takes to grow many common crops! Follow this link to a great article.MaineCommercialBadge (1)

IMG_4987 copyEnergy on the Farm

We take our energy impact very seriously here and are always looking for ways to use less fuel and electricity. By our thinking, the source of our electricity is also important. How electricity is produced,  how and where oil is drilled reflects the impact of our use as well.  With this in mind we have switched to a couple new energy supplies. Starting this winter we joined Maine Green Power which guarantees that our electricity dollars are going towards Maine tidal, hydro, and biomass production. We have also switched to 100 % Maine Biofuel to run our tractors and heat our buildings and greenhouse. Maine Bio sources all of their fuel from recycled sources, mostly restaurant deep friers!  The tractor exhaust smells much better these days!

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Dog, pigs and cows wait for spring…

Some times in our lives test our optimism. For all the farmers I know, this spring (and the three months preceding) fall into this category. I could go on at length but all of you have lived through it as well, so I’ll just say we are ready for a change. Leila suggested we keep singing this spring anthem and continue to keep hope alive (click here)

Here’s what’s ahead in this posting…

  • Thawing and Growing: Our farm update
  • Blueberries
  • Improvements at Crystal Spring
  • Green Power at the Farm
  • Shares and Payments
  • Farm Camp
  • New-member Orientation Dates

Thawing and Growing

The farm is cranking along, running full speed towards a glorious season. Our new apprentice crew has been here for the past two weeks, helping to fill the greenhouse with seedlings and care for all of the animals. Ben, Chrystina and Tyler all come to us from Maine (a first) and the culinary world.  All three are eager to get their hands dirty producing food this summer instead of cooking it (Maura, Kristin and I are looking forward to some great crew lunches!) Kristin, our star apprentice of the past two years is back as our first full-time, year round field manager. We are very lucky to have her considerable skill and energy this year.

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Grafted tomato seedlings healing in their spa

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60,000 seedlings…waiting just like the rest of us.

To date we have a little over 60,000 plants thriving in the greenhouse. Walking into that seventy degree space of lush green is about the most therapeutic activity imaginable. Hopefully this coming week of weather comes as forecasted and we can try to get some of these seedlings in the ground soon. The past few days we have been grafting tomatoes which is a process of cutting the fruiting tops off our our favorite varieties and sticking them onto more vigorous and disease resistant roots.  The plants heal together after about ten days and then we have super tomatoes to plant out in May.

Blueberries

This past fall we signed a lease with a local family for seventy acres of wild blueberries.  We are in the process of certifying these acres and hope to be able to offer year-round organic berries grown right here in Brunswick!

Improvements…

While I clocked an exceptional number of hours moving snow this winter, the remaining time available to me has been consumed with our walk-in cooler/freezer project.  Over the past eleven seasons we have gradually outgrown our beautiful old walk-in cooler in the CSA barn. This fact, along with the need for frozen blueberry storage, led me to make some major changes in our washing and packing barn.  This barn had a dairy parlor that was cutting edge in 1955, but of little use on a farm that hasn’t milked cows for over forty years.  After a week of demolition, the dairy parlor and about forty-five yards of concrete are gone, and the new insulated floor is ready to be poured.  Some auction hunting turned up a cooler/freezer combo and with any luck we will have the electrical and refrigeration ready to turn on but June 1.  All very exciting but I can’t wait for the project to be complete and start filling the space with fresh produce!

The Farm Powers Up Green

This year we have been one of a growing number of Maine businesses and households to sign on with Maine Green Power and use 100% sustainable electricity produced here in Maine. Just like the food we produce, all of the power we use here on the farm is local! By pledging to buy power though this program we buy our share of power coming only from sustainable hydro, tidal, and wood waste power plants here in Maine.

Brunswick Shares Sold Out…Portland-area delivered shares still available

Thank you to all of you for signing on for another year.  The Brunswick on-farm shares are now full!  We do have availability for our delivered shares to the Portland area.

Payments!

For those of you who would like to make a payment, click here.  To make online payments, the form will ask for a member number.  You can find this in an emailed receipt from when you initially signed up.  If you cannot find that email, and need to know your number, just send us an email and we’ll get it to you.  The payment link will now also be posted on the home page of our website.

Farm Camp 2015 Still has Spaces

Farm Camp has a few more spaces for five and six year olds during the week of July 13th.  The program runs from 9-noon, and there is more information on the website.  The other two weeks are now full.  We do have some availability for junior counselors…email Maura for more info.

New Member Orientation

We invite new members to visit the farm for an informal orientation, to meet us and learn the ropes of the CSA pick up here at the farm.   Please come if you can either Saturday May 30 at 4:00 pm or Sunday May 31 at 4:00.  If you’re not able to come, we will show you around when you do come to pick up your vegetables.  This orientation is geared for Brunswick on-farm members, but people who are receiving a delivered share are welcome to come.  We will hold farm visits in July more specifically for our delivered share members, dates to be determined.

 

Hello and happy greetings from Crystal Spring Farm!IMG_1594

We hope you’re staying warm and able to enjoy the abundance of snow!   Three snow days in one week!  We’ve enjoyed some moments here and there of relaxing and reading by the wood stove, but we have ample work to keep us moving outside as well.

Animals

IMG_8288While the vegetable fields rest frozen this is time when the animals on the farm take center stage. We have a very active group of winter pigs who have turned over the house garden in between heavy feeding of brewery grain and kitchen scraps.  The 23 heifers (female cows who have yet to have a calf) on the farm this winter have spent most of the year on the back pasture behind the house but were happy to be indoors for the recent blizzard.

 

 

We know some of you are wondering when the lambs are arriving on the ground.  The blizzard brought our first set of twins.  As Seth was busy clearing snow for many (many) hours on Wednesday, Leila took charge of the care for the newborns.  Unfortunately the mother was not producing milk, so Leila took over the warming, drying, and bottle feeding of these two littles, whom she named Hugs and Kisses (after being licked in the face).  We make sure our pregnant ladies get plenty of fresh air and exercise by putting their silage bales away from the barn.   We’re ready and waiting for more lambing action in the barn!IMG_8668

Inside

Seed orders are done and the packets and boxes have been trickling in each day.  We are due to sow our first flats into our compost based potting soil (also just arrived) the first week of March.

We are very thankful that both Kristin and Tom, two of our star apprentices who are hunkered down with us this winter to assist with animal care, will be back for another season.  Tom will be on the farm part time and Kristin will be our first full time assistant manager.  She will be managing our farm crew and daily details of the vegetable fields to allow Seth to focus his attention on our new blueberry venture.

Blueberries

We just signed a lease on seventy-one acres of wild blueberries adjacent to the farm and are very excited to add this new farm product.  We have a lot to do before harvest begins in late July, including hiring weevers and rakers, buying harvest equipment and putting in a new freezer.

Barn Renovation

With the blizzard snow cleared by Wednesday, on Thursday and Friday Seth began to renovate one of the barns to add a new vegetable cooler and freezer. IMG_1596We have outgrown the beautiful antique cork cooler in the CSA barn we have been using for the last decade. By adding this new unit we will be able to keep everything cool without having to stack crates to the ceiling! To make space for the new walk-in he is pulling out 30-40 yards of concrete that was the old three cow milking parlour from the 1950’s.

Lease

Many of you may have seen an article in the local papers this fall regarding the completion of our long term lease agreement with the Brunswick Topsham Land Trust.  This was a team effort over many years involving blood, sweat, tears, many meetings, lawyers, consultants, revisions, and reams of paper, resulting in a fifty year lease. This a one-of-a-kind document will give us security that we can pass on to our kids or the next lucky farmer here.  As always, we keep you, our customers and supporters at the forefront of our gratitude list.  Your participation in this farm is the critical piece.  Continuing to value local, organic food and knowing your farmer is the root of success for all of us.  Thank you!

Sign up now!

If you have delayed signing up for 2015 now is the time.  We do have shares left.  The link to sign up is on our website, or you can click here.

Please contact us with any questions, we always like hearing from you!

Payment Plan

For those of you taking part in our payment plan, February payments are now due.  Look for an email today with directions and a link to our online payment page.

Farm Camp

The emails and phone calls have begun wondering about our dates for Farm Camp.  We will update all the information, with dates, details, and registration on the Farm Camp page of our website by Wednesday February 4.

Beer waste

For the past year we have been working with Maine Beer Company in Freeport to convert their brewing by-products into animal feeds and fertilizer. Twice a week we pick up spent barley and a pasty product best described as yeasty, hoppy glop. The barley is a great addition to our pigs ration and both the barley and the glop are stellar field fertilizers that exceed sheep manure in their nutritive value. If you like Maine Beer Company brews (Peeper is magic in a bottle) you can drink with satisfaction knowing you are supplying your vegetables with valuable fertilizer!

 

Another season comes to a close here on the farm.  Our last pick-up will be one for the pantry with potatoes and winter squash leading the way.  Read on for our bulleted list of how to store all of these year end items to enjoy into the winter months. By all accounts we have had a an exceptional year of produce and quite possibly the most pleasant in the past decade from the farmer’s point of view. We had regular rain, temperate temperatures, and no wild cards in the form of disease or pest invasions.  Our farm crew was top notch this year, working hard since we started in the snowy fields in April. When all of this comes together all we can say is thank you.

IMG_9366We hope that you can make good use of all this food in the weeks or maybe even months to come. Fall, especially in the northeast where we know that darker days are coming, is the season of gathering. Bringing together all the ingredients we need to make the winter comfortable and warm. Beyond the food you bring home from the farm we hope that your weekly visits this summer can also be stored away and enjoyed again when the snow flies and the days are shorter. When our kids were little we read them a favorite book about a group of mice preparing for winter. These mice would gather nuts and seeds, straw and grass, storing all of it away in an old stone wall where they lived. All of the mice worked very hard at this except for one named Frederick who would be seen just looking out at the sunrise or studying the fall flowers. The other mice asked him what he was doing while they worked so hard. He replied “I’m gathering the suns warmth because winter is cold and the colors of the fall because the months ahead are grey.”  As we all rush around filling our stores hopefully we can take a moment to gather up these lovely days and put them up as well.

How Do I Store these Vegetables?IMG_7687

  • Beets, Carrots, Potatoes, Cabbage– Plastic bag with a hole or two (they are alive and have to breath a little) in a cold part of the fridge.
  • Winter Squash and Sweet Potatoes– Pack loose in a box. Cool but not cold (60-55˚) and dry place with little air movement. A closet or garage with some heat is good.
  • Onions– Cold in plastic bag. Keep them away from other storage items (or everything will taste like onions!).

Crystal Spring Farm Grass-Fed Beef Almost Gone

We have but two beef freezer packages left as this newsletter goes out. If you are thinking about this act now! Here is the description of what we are offering: Fill your freezer with Crystal Spring Farm Grass Fed Beef this winter.   Our grass-fed and grass finished animals are raised on Crystal Spring Farm certified Organic pastures.  Grass-fed beef is high in healthy Omega-3’s and cancer fighting CLA’s not to mention it tastes great.  Family Freezer Packages are $325 for 45 pounds and come frozen and vacuum packed. This amount will fit into the standard size family freezer but without much space to spare. We ask for a deposit of $50 and we will be in contact with the date in December when your beef will be ready. Follow this link to make you deposit online.

Each package will include:

  •  Assortment of 10-14 oz steaks including Delmonico, Sirloin, and NY Strip
  •  Several 2-3 lb Roasts
  •  1lb packages of Ground
  •  1lb packages of Kebobs and Steak Tips
  •  1lb packages of Stew Cubes

Reserve Your Farm Share for Next Year!

Many Thanks to all of you who have signed up with us for next season!  We have had a great record turnout so far and will open up sign-up to our wait list later this week.  If you have not signed up yet and are planning on it please do!  We have an easy payment plan program to break up the cost of your share over the winter. Click here for the link.

What’s In the Share…

Carrots

Sweet Potatoes

Potatoes

Lettuce

Parsnips

Kale

Winter Squash

Onions

Brussels Sprouts

Cabbage

 

It’s Cold. Bring on the Root Crops

The grace period is over and we are into fall, for real. What’s the upside? Great tasting root crops. Beets, carrots, parsnips, rutabaga, potatoes. Nothing warms like these starchy, sugary gifts.IMG_4533 Here’s the secret to enjoying root crops this time of year. Turn on the oven. We like 400˚. Chop all of them to to a 3/4-1″ size. Toss them together in you favorite oil (olive, peanut and sesame are lovely). Add salt, pepper, rosemary, paprika. Lay them out in a single layer on a baking sheet. Roast them for 20-30 minutes. Turn them and leave them for 15-20 more or until soft and then enjoy. They will brown slightly and fill the house with warm smells.

IMG_6473Crystal Spring Farm Grass-Fed Beef

For the first time we will be offering a Family freezer package.Fill your freezer with Crystal Spring Farm Grass Fed Beef this winter.   Our grass-fed and grass finished animals are raised on Crystal Spring Farm certified Organic pastures.  Grass-fed beef is high in healthy Omega-3’s and cancer fighting CLA’s not to mention it tastes great.  Family Freezer Packages are $325 for 45 pounds and come frozen and vacuum packed. This amount will fit into the standard size family freezer but without much space to spare. We ask for a deposit of $50 and we will be in contact with the date in December when your beef will be ready. Follow this link to make you deposit online.

Each package will include:

  •  Assortment of 10-14 oz steaks including Delmonico, Sirloin, and NY Strip
  •  Several 2-3 lb Roasts
  •  1lb packages of Ground
  •  1lb packages of Kebobs and Steak Tips
  •  1lb packages of Stew Cubes

What’s Ahead: When is the last week?

We have two more weeks of harvest!   Our last pick-up date at the farm will be Friday the 31st (Halloween!).  Next week will be heavy. We have lots and lots of potatoes and winter squash to send you home with so please get ready. Clear out a space and bring a box!  Barring disaster, we will have Brussels Sprouts for the last week.

Reserve Your Share for Next Year

Many Thanks to all of you who have signed up with us for next season!  We have had a great turnout so far and will open up sign-up to our wait list next week.  If you have not signed up yet and are planning on it please do!  We have an easy payment plan program to break up the cost of your share over the winter.

Crystal Spring Rosemont Market Farm-to Table Dinner

We had an incredible meal this past weekend with four courses of our own produce paired with great wines and good conversation. Our first farm-to-table dinner was a great success and we hope to plan more of these for next summer.

How Do I Store these Vegetables?IMG_7687

  • Beets, Carrots, Potatoes, Cabbage– Plastic bag with a hole or two (they are alive and have to breath a little) in a cold part of the fridge.
  • Winter Squash and Sweet Potatoes– Pack loose in a box. Cool but not cold (60-55˚) and dry place with little air movement. A closet or garage with some heat is good.
  • Onions– Cold in plastic bag. Keep them away from other storage items (or everything will taste like onions!).

What’s In the Share…

Carrots

Beets

Sweet Potatoes

Potatoes

Lettuce

Kale

Asian Greens

Winter Squash

Onions

Radishes

Spinach

 

We have six new piglets on the farm as of last friday. We usually don’t keep pigs over the winter here for one simple reason, they eat a lot. The feed requirement for growing pigs when the temps drop below freezing goes up considerably because they require extra calories just to keep warm. For most farms that would have meant a significant increase in feed costs to keep them growing.  IMG_7926In the past year we have befriended a couple of local craft breweries and they have been sharing their “waste” with us which has offered us a solution to the winter feeding problem.  Maine Beer Company in Freeport supplies us with spent grain, mostly malted barley that comes from their tanks after the wort from their many stellar brews is made. This wet mash has had most of the carbohydrate steeped out of it but is high in protein.  Allagash Brewing in Portland has been taking delivered CSA shares for a few of their employees for a couple years.  They occasionally have of malted grains come in that don’t meet their high standards or have been in storage too long to brew with. When this happens they need someone to take these odd lots, which is where we come in. The best part about having both of these breweries as friends is that their waste grains come together into a perfect feed for our piglets.  Spent grain is low in carbohydrate but high in protein. Malted grain has very available carbohydrate but too little protein by itself. If we add these two together along with some essential vitamins and minerals we have a pretty good pig feed.  This time of year we can also round out their diet with culled vegetables which will ensure that these little guys should have a happy and healthy winter here with us.

 Sign-up for 2015…

Thanks to all of you who signed up so far. If you are planning on it and haven’t yet, don’t wait! Sign up here online. We have more folks on our wait list than ever before and we want to be sure current members who would like a share are signed up first.

Farm to Table Dinner at the Farm

Place_settings-_Crystal_Springs_Farm_posterWe are hosting a farm to table dinner Sunday October 19th with Rosemont Market and Bakery. The dinner will be made completely from Crystal Spring produce and meats with wine parings and a cocktail to sip during a pre-dinner farm walk. The butcher shop at Rosemont is where most of our lamb is sold and they have a very successful business in the Portland that is based wholly on quality local food. Here’s the info link for the event. Tickets are $85 and can be purchased at brownpapertickets.com.

 

Stock up for Fall

Our cupboards are full here at the farm. In addition to lots of vegetable to take home we also have plenty of great local products…

  • Dark Maple Syrup
  • CSF Honey– doesn’t get more local!
  • CSF Frozen Blueberries– Enjoy summer all winter long
  • Willow Pond Apple Cider– This stuff is too good
  • CSF Ground Lamb– Our own Grass Fed
  • CSF Ground Beef– Our own Grass Fed
  • Sparrow Farm Organic Eggs

What’s in the share…

Carrots

Beets

Potatoes

Winter Squash

Lettuce

Asian Greens

Arugula

Parsnips

Rutabaga

Onions

 

We finished harvesting all of our potatoes about a week ago which is out last big crop to get out of the ground this year. Its always a substantial effort as many of you know from years past when we invited members to our labor day CSA harvest. This year we planted our crop much later than usual, trying to miss some the destruction of the Colorado Potato Beetle and this change made a labor dayIMG_7834 harvest too early. We were resigned to having the farm crew spend a week on this crop when we got a call from longtime friend and farm advocate Rick Wilson. Rick is a teacher at Brunswick High and among other things teaches a service learning class to juniors and seniors. The focus of his class is to give high school students a hands on sense of the real world beyond the doors of the school as the class visits and works around the community. Two sections of this class came to the farm, had a tour and a question and answer session followed by a good hour of picking potatoes with the farm crew. During this time we were able to get most of the potatoes up and the students had a real farm experience. Rick had them write reflection essays which he shared with me. Here are a few notable quotes; “Crystal Spring was an experience like no other where we allowed to get our hands dirty”, “It (farming) definitely  isn’t a career I’ll be pursuing though it was pretty cool” and “Crystal Spring Farm definitely gives a person a sense of place because the work that you are doing is for the people, and the people are also the reason that the farm exists today”. I followed up the kids visits to the farm with two slide and lecture sessions at the high school that gave more detail about how the farm works as a business. The whole experience was a grand success and it’s always comforting to hear that what we do here is “pretty cool”.

When is the Last Share Pick Up?

At this point, baring extreme weather, we are planning to have our final harvest during the last week of October. The last day of pickup falls on Friday the 31st, Halloween!

Sign-up for 2015…Now!

Many Thanks to all of you who signed up in the last week. If you are planning on it and haven’t yet, don’t wait! Sign up here online. We have more folks on our wait list than ever before and we want to be sure current members who would like a share are signed up first.

Farm to Table Dinner at the Farm

Place_settings-_Crystal_Springs_Farm_posterWe are hosting a farm to table dinner Sunday October 19th with Rosemont Market and Bakery. The dinner will be made completely from Crystal Spring produce and meats with wine parings and a cocktail to sip during a pre-dinner farm walk. The butcher shop at Rosemont is where most of our lamb is sold and they have a very successful business in the Portland that is based wholly on quality local food. Here’s the info link for the event. Tickets are $85 and can be purchased at brownpapertickets.com.

 

Stock up for Fall

Our cupboards are full here at the farm. In addition to lots of vegetable to take home we also have plenty of great local products…

  • Dark Maple Syrup
  • CSF Honey– doesn’t get more local!
  • CSF Frozen Blueberries– Enjoy summer all winter long
  • Willow Pond Apple Cider– This stuff is too good
  • CSF Ground Lamb– Our own Grass Fed
  • CSF Ground Beef– Our own Grass Fed
  • Sparrow Farm Organic Eggs

What’s in the share…

Carrots

Beets

Potatoes

Delicata Squash

Lettuce

Arugula

Chard/Kale

Salad Turnips

Peppers

Shallots

Sweet potatoes

 

Sign-up for 2015…Now!

We have had a great year and this a the best time to sign up for next season. Help us plan ahead for the summer ahead and sign up here online. We have more folks on our wait list than ever before and we want to be sure all of you current members who would like a share are signed up first.

Stock up for Fall

Our cupboards are full here at the farm. In addition to lots of vegetable to take home we also have plenty of great local products…

  • Dark Maple Syrup
  • CSF Honey– doesn’t get more local!
  • CSF Frozen Blueberries– Enjoy summer all winter long
  • Willow Pond Apple Cider– This stuff is too good
  • CSF Ground Lamb– Our own Grass Fed
  • CSF Ground Beef– Our own Grass Fed
  • CSF Elderberry Syrup– Keep healthy this winter
  • Sparrow Farm Organic Eggs

What’s in the share….

Carrots

Beets

Potatoes

Squash

Cabbage

Sweet/hot peppers

Lettuce

Chard/Kale

Asian greens

Kohlrabi

Salad turnips

Onions

 
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