Prior to farming in Maine, two decades ago I worked on a farm in California.  Of the many differences between west coast agriculture and east, I was most  looking forward to two things, winter (i.e. vacation) and regular rain. Midcoast Maine's 36 to 40 inch annual average put the monthly rainfall at three to four inches, perfect for the one inch weekly needs of most vegetable crops. We knew we would still need irrigation (as averages are always just averages) so we put in one well, assembled a makeshift system to move water between fields using portable pipes, and ran water a few times a year in the early seasons. The past three years we have been running water about twenty weeks of our thirty week active growing season. This increase has caused us to improve the irrigation system, burying some of our above ground pipes and adding new ways of delivering water to crops that are more portable and put water on faster. Over the past 3 years we have spent about $13,500 in new equipment, and increased labor time running the system, which is a significant addition to our annual budget. We are just a little postage stamp of a farm in Maine. When I think of all the changes farms large and small across the country have had to make because of our changing climate my mind goes into astro physics mind blown mode. 

Thankfully I am grounded everyday on the farm by the incredible people I have the deep honor of working with in the fields. Our crew is simply the best. Focused, committed, and with a sense humor through it all, they make this farm live and breathe. Every day that we have a crew that is willing to share their passion and vigor with us in the field is a day that we make this little postage stamp a better place.

What's in the Share

Arugula

Lettuce

Baby Boy Choi

Tatsoi

Grilling leeks

Scallions

Summer onions

Chickories

Daikon

Summer Squash

Cukes

Broccoli

Kohlrabi

Cabbage

Baby Kale

What's in Upic

Peas (waning)

Herbs (basil, dill, cilantro, sage, parsley, chives, oregano)

Flowers!

 

Objects in motion tend to stay in motion. Newton must have worked a farm crew as a kid, getting that first law percolating in his young brain (maybe that pushed him to hit the books a bit harder to get off the farm). This time of year if we stop our forward motion we are done for.  The rails that guide our inertia are the lists of things to harvest, weed, pick-up and put down.  The process of making them and checking them off is almost tidal. Tasks wash up one day and are swept away the next.  From the passer by it might look static but to those of us rolling in the surf the gain and loss is constant.

Our full hearted crew has been plowing through the backlog of tasks in pouring rain and blistering heat. Smiles and laughter are present from 6:00 am until 5:00 pm. If they are in any way representative of the future I feel confident the next generation will kick this country back on track. 

What's in the share

Kohlrabi

Summer onions

Scallions

Red/green Cabbage

Broccoli

Cukes

Summer Squash

Kale

Arugula

Garlic scapes

Lettuce Heads/Mix

Mini Daikon

Chickories

What's in Upic

Snow/Snap Peas

Basil

Cilantro

Thyme

Marjoram

Savory

Chives

Parsley