Cured

 

 

After two weeks n the greenhouse squash arrives this week with our first offerings of both acorn and delicata. The acorn are deep green and the delicata are oblong with green stripes. The delicata have very tender skins and if you oil them prior to roasting you can eat the skins right along with the squash. Both do well in the oven for a fast simple meal. We like  to halve them, scoop out the seeds and cook them cut side down on a baking sheet at 400 degrees. For an added bonus and to further entice reluctant diners, after baking until tender, turn them cut side up and brush with butter and or maple syrup and broil until they start to brown.

Cider is here. Who needs water?

What goes better with squash than a crisp glass of cider?  We now have the world’s best cider from Willow Pond Farm in Sabattus.  Jill and Charlie are like magicians with their apples blending together just the right amount of tart and sweet to deliver a consistent outstanding product.  If you haven’t tried this stuff take home a couple gallons (one for the freezer) and toast the  fall.

Fall Color

You’ll find some great color in your potatoes this week as we bring out the red and blue varieties. Mix and match them equally and roast, fry or coarsely mash them together for a feast fit for the eyes as well as the taste buds. Both varieties keep their color when color when cooked!

Radishes are beautiful this week…they go with everything. Sliced and tossed with rice vinegar is particularly lovely.

What’s Coming…

We start harvesting sweet potatoes this week. This is a crop we been growing for the past four or five years and we have really come to love them. Sweets are from a radically different climate than coastal Maine but a few short season, tasty varieties have made them somewhat common on our local produce scene. Like squash and onions, this fall crop needs curing before they can be eaten. After we get them out of the ground this week we will pack them into our second produce cooler. Instead of cooling them we’ll add a heater and bring the temp up to 80-85 degrees and hold them there for a couple weeks until the skins harden and they start to taste like sweet heaven…start dreaming up your meals now.

Whats in Upic?

Dill

Thyme

Cilantro

Flowers

What’s in the share?

The last tomato

Asian greens

Arugula

Shallots

Acorn/Delicata Squash

Radishes

Red/Blue Potatoes

Kale

Chard

 

 

 

 

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